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25 June 2007 @ 07:41 pm
BY THE GODDESS!  

 Well, isn't that just like a woman.

Earth goddess, X-men Leader, Morlock champion, rebel punk, and master thief......but we all know what really matters.

Fantastic Four  #547
Written by: Dwayne McDuffie
Art by: Paul Pelletier

!

"You can tell Michael Collins that my hair is completely natural."
"This is NOT  a weave!"





Please , let that character be a skrull. I call on the goddess of comics and the saint of fangirls- let that character be a skrull...
 
 
 
Humph: ebonbird Storm (punk)spiralsheep on June 29th, 2007 09:57 pm (UTC)
Likewise, if they write for Fantastic Four, they have a similar obligation to write for a multi-cultural readership. That doesn't mean he must avoid all cultural references or use one that say... non-Americans don't get because we don't see your television.

What it means is, if the scene hinges on a specific cultural reference, he needs to consider how it will or won't be understood by people outside the culture while remaining true to the character. It's not a one or the other scenario, there's room for both.


I'll set aside your incorrect assumption that I'm American.

The first bit seems to be saying that your think writers should be allowed to use specific cultural references: "That doesn't mean he must avoid all cultural references or use one that say... non-Americans don't get".

The second bit seems to be saying that no comics writer should ever use any reference that every English reading person in the appropriate age-group on the entire planet will immediately understand: "if the scene hinges on a specific cultural reference, he needs to consider how it will or won't be understood by people outside the culture".

I have no way to decide which of those you intended but if you decide on one then feel free to let me know. Although I personally don't want to read comics written with an extremely narrow range of approved cultural expression so if that's what you decide you want then we're unlikely to agree because I prefer genuine multi-culturalism which embraces diversity (as in Britain where I'm from) instead of global monoculturalism which caters to the narrowest common range of cultural referents.
Jkarabellajkarabella on June 30th, 2007 12:04 am (UTC)
My bad on the American assumption.

It's not a matter of cultural diversity, it's a matter of communication. Cultural references people don't get that don't effect the core story are inconsequential. A reference to someone liking a band, dressing a certain way, having a favourite author, using a colloquial term you can understand by implication etc.

We're going in a lot of circles. I'll try to formulate an example:

I writer decides that some part of knowledge from a book that is an iconic work will be a characters motivation for an action, and they want this to be understood by the whole audience (not just those familiar with the book).

If they show the character reading a copy with a plain cover with just the title and the author's name, we have no indicator as to the content of the book beyond the title and the character reading it. That doesn't work, it requires the audience to know something about the book.

If they show the character reading a copy of the book with promo blurb on the back of it with a couple of key words highlighted for easy reading, and a front cover with imagery that sets the mood, then people who have never heard of the book get a solid impression of what it's about. They probably won't guess the specifics, but they'll be able to connect it.

This applies if the book is A Brief History of Time and Space, The Prince, Das Capital, The Kinsey Report, Thus Spoke Zarathustra or The Souls of Black Folk. It applies whether you're writing a character is white, black or purple. It's part of storytelling, helping you audience understand the story.

Not every incident needs to be thus explained, just the ones that have great story importance or confusion. Indeed, I think it is better if the character has aspects of their culture that are not explained such. It makes others curious and avoids overtelling.
Humph: ebonbird Storm (punk)spiralsheep on June 30th, 2007 12:33 pm (UTC)
It's not a matter of cultural diversity, it's a matter of communication. Cultural references people don't get that don't effect the core story are inconsequential. A reference to someone liking a band, dressing a certain way, having a favourite author, using a colloquial term you can understand by implication etc.

I'm glad you finally agree with me that a two page scene about a black character's hair doesn't need to be explained for the benefit of people who don't understand why it's rude to make personal comments and why the person being commented on is angry about those personal comments.
Jkarabellajkarabella on June 30th, 2007 11:43 pm (UTC)
Well since that was the core of the story of those two pages, I would have liked a hint. Does that make me a bad person?